Duke O'Brien Center for Kidney Research - Duke O'Brien Center for Kidney Research

The Duke O'Brien Kidney Research Center's Clinical and Translational Core (DOCK-CTC) is accepting proposal submissions. The Study Implementation Group (SIG) for the DOCK-CTC will review each of these application in order to determine which application will receive funding. Click here to obtain more information about the submission and review process. Below is a list of funded investigators by the DOCK-CTC for 2013-2014.


tyson
Dr. Crystal Tyson received her medical degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine and completed her residency at St. John Hospital and Medical Center, where she also served as Chief Resident. Dr. Tyson’s project “Effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Pattern (DASH) on Blood Pressure and Serum Electrolytes in Patients with Moderate Kidney Disease: A Pilot Study” is one being funded by the DOCK. The study aims to show that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products with reduced total and saturated fat, cholesterol, and sugar-sweetened products effectively lowers blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension and stage I hypertension. Crystal’s project was published in the Clinical Kidney Journal.


 

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Dr. Kelly Muir received her medical degree from Duke University School of Medicine, where she also completed her residency and fellowship programs in ophthalmology and glaucoma. She is an opthalmologist and health services researcher with research interests in outcomes of glaucoma, health literacy and medication adherence. Dr. Muir’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Understanding the Associations between Hypertension, Retinopathy, and Diabetic Kidney Disease”. The aims of this study are to describe the prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy in participants in the STOP-DKD study in relation to race, and to investigate the association between severity of diabetic retinopathy and severity of diabetic kidney disease.


vemulapalli
Dr. Sreekanth Vemulapalli received his medical degree from the Duke University School of Medicine, completed his residency in Internal Medicine at the University of California-San Francisco, and completed his fellowship in Cardiovascular Diseases and Cardiovascular Imaging at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Vemulapalli’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs in Patients with Apparent Treatment-Resistant Hypertension in the United States.” Among individuals with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension in a linked REGARDS-Medicare cohort, the aims of this study are to (1) characterize individuals identified; (2) describe their patterns of care; and (3) compare their 1 year healthcare resource utilization and medical costs.


samad
Dr. Zainab Samad received her medical degree from Aga Khan University Medical College in Pakistan, and completed both her residency and fellowship programs at Duke University Medical Center. She is a cardiologist and her research interests include cardiac imaging, valvular heart disease, and incremental diagnostic value of various diagnostic tests and their impact on outcomes. Dr. Samad’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Prevalence, Management and outcomes of Valve Disease Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.” The aims of this study are to (1) Define the prevalence and outcomes of aortic and mitral valve calcification, AS and MR among patients with CKD and ESRD; (2) Evaluate the progression of AS amongst patients with CKD and ESRD; and (3) Describe use of surgical interventions and outcomes among patients with CKD who have valve disease that meets AHA/ACC guideline criteria for surgery.


Leah Zullig
Dr. Leah Zullig earned her PhD in Health Policy and Management from the University of North Carolina. She is an investigator in the Division of General Internal Medicine in the Department of Medicine, and a Core Investigator at the Durham Veteran Affairs Medical Center. Her research focuses on the reduction of healthcare disparities, developing cancer care quality monitoring systems, and promoting patient chronic disease self-management. Dr. Zullig’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurement Among Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease and Hypertension.” The aims of this study are to characterize subclinical cardiovascular disease in participants in the STOP-DKD study by using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring measurements and evaluate differences by race.


g.michael-felker-md-mhsTariq A
Dr. Michael Felker is an Advanced Heart Failure and Heart Transplant Specialist with a clinical interest in heart failure, cardiac transplantation, and novel therapies for advanced heart failure. Mentored by Dr. Felker, Dr. Tariq Ahmad is a fourth year fellow focusing on advanced training in cardiology. He received his medical degree from the State University of New York (SUNY) Stony Brook and completed his residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Drs. Felker and Ahmad’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Changes in Biomarkers After Left Ventricular Mechanical Circulatory Support.” The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of LVAD support on biomarkers of cardiac and renal function in stable outpatients with long term (>6 months) continuous-flow LVAD devices. Their team is focused on understanding the inter-relationship between biomarkers of cardiac and renal function with LVAD support.


Neda
Dr. Nada El Husseini is an assistant professor in neurology (Wake Forest University, with Duke adjunct) with clinical interests in stroke, intracranial hemorrhage and, cerebrovascular disease. She received training in clinical research at the Duke Clinical Research Training Program and completed an American Heart Association/Bugher Cerebrovascular Research Fellowship. She is interested in collaborative research that aims to improve outcomes for stroke patients, including patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose clinical outcomes are typically worse.

Dr. El Husseini's current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, "Factors Predicting Mortality and Re-hospitalization in Subjects with Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease." The goal of this study is to identify whether CKD interacts with and modifies the effect of traditional predictors of post-stroke mortality and re-hospitalization. The study will use the Get-With-The Guidelines (GWTG) database linked with fee-for-service Medicare claims data.