Proposals 2012-2013 - Duke O'Brien Center for Kidney Research

The Duke O'Brien Kidney Research Center's Clinical and Translational Core (DOCK-CTC) is accepting proposal submissions.  The Study Implementation Group (SIG) for the DOCK-CTC will review each of these application in order to determine which application will receive funding. Click here to obtain more information about the submission and review process. Below is a list of funded investigators by the DOCK-CTC for 2012-2013.


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Dr. Hayden Bosworth received his PhD from Pennsylvania State University and is a health services researcher, who focuses on patient and organization level factors to improve treatment adherence. His three areas of clinical research are: 1) improving patients’ treatment adherence and self-management in chronic care; 2) translating research findings to improve the delivery of high quality care; and 3) eliminating health care disparities. This work has evaluated the impact of several interventions to improve health behaviors related to chronic disease management, including for coronary artery disease, diabetes, and depression.

Dr. Bosworth’s current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Evaluation of a Personalized Cardiovascular Disease Intervention to Improve Kidney Health Outcomes and Health Care Utilization among Patients with Diabetes.” He and his team plan to examine the impact of a telehealth intervention among Medicaid beneficiaries with diabetes and cardiovascular disease who are at high risk for kidney disease. This study will evaluate the preliminary impact, efficiency, and cost effectiveness of an ongoing telehealth intervention that is delivered by a nurse case manager. In addition to facilitating larger implementation studies, this project seeks to further elucidate the potential for both short and long term cost savings to the healthcare system. This project addresses the DOCK theme by using health services research methodology to estimate the simultaneous impact of improving care for hypertension and cardiovascular disease on kidney disease.


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Dr. Sunil Rao received his medical degree and training at Ohio State University College of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center respectfully. He is a cardiologist and clinical investigator with a clinical interest in interventional cardiology. His focus of research is on outcomes in patients with ischemic heart disease, quality assessment and improvement through registries, and clinical trials in interventional cardiology.

Mentored by Dr. Rao, Dr. John Roberts earned his medical degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, completed his internal medicine residency and nephrology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center, and is currently an Instructor at Duke. Drs. Rao and Robert's current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled "Comparative Safety and Efficacy between Management Strategies for Clinically Significant CAD among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease." He and his team will determine the comparative safety and efficacy between four management strategies among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for clinically significant coronary artery disease from a prospective registry, the Duke Databank of Cardiovascular Disease: coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent, percutaneous coronary intervention with bare metal stent, and medical management. The primary outcome is death, with secondary outcomes of repeat revascularization, myocardial infarction, and stroke. In addition to identifying gaps that may require additional studies, the results of this comparative effectiveness study seeks to inform clinical decisions regarding the treatment of clinically significant coronary artery disease among adults with CKD.


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Dr. William Kraus received his training at Duke University School of Medicine. He is a cardiologist and translational research investigator. His clinical and research interests are in cardiac rehabilitation and prevention, congestive heart failure, exercise physiology, genetics of cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease.

Dr. Kraus’ current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled, “Association of eGFR with Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in the EPESE and CATHGEN cohorts.” He and his team will use two established cohorts to address questions regarding the additive and independent contribution of renal function to the prediction of morbidity and mortality in elderly (EPESE) and high risk cardiovascular populations (CATHGEN), respectively. Renal function will be estimated and combined with established risk markers in the respective populations to assess its independent and additive contribution. This project addresses the DOCK theme by using a biomarker risk prediction approach to determine the effect of kidney disease on cardiovascular disease.


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Dr. Jennifer Li received her medical degree from Duke University Medical School, completed her residency and fellowhip training at both Duke University Medical Center and Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia. She is a pediatric cardiologist and clinical investigator with clinical interests in pediatric cardiology, echocardiography, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Her five areas of research interest are: 1) pediatric hypertension and hyperlipidemia; 2) clinical trials in children with heart disease; 3) thrombosis in patients with congenital heart disease; 4) enzyme replacement in Pompe disease; and 5) infective endocarditis.

Mentored by Dr. Li, Dr. Kevin Watt earned his medical degree from the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill School of Medicine, completed his pediatric residency and critical care fellowship at Duke University Medical Center, and is currently an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Duke. Their current project for the DOCK Clinical Translational Core is entitled "Comparative Safety and Efficacy of Antihypertensive Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Kidney Disease." This study will determine the comparative safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatments among pediatric patients across the spectrum of kidney function. The study team seeks to evaluate whether children with mild kidney disease suffer from increased drug related adverse events and whether they have a decreased response to antihypertensive therapy relative to children with normal kidney function. The results from this comparative effectiveness study will help inform clinical decisions regarding the optimal treatment of hypertension among children and adolescents with kidney disease.